SCARY HORROR STUFF: Why the Works of Shakespeare Can Make for a Great Horror Anthology
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Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Why the Works of Shakespeare Can Make for a Great Horror Anthology

The proof is in the news of the day for the horror genre, specifically regarding Lifetime's aim for a new pilot entitled "A Midsummer's Nightmare." Now if you're thinking that this might be based on one of Willie Shakes' actual comedies of a similar title, you're most likely correct. It is. Just repurposed and revisioned as a psychological thriller series, and I applaud that sense of creativity --

That Brings Me to the Point: Shakespeare's Ripe Content for Horror


After all, look at some of the tragedies he has! "Titus Andronicus" encompasses so much visceral imagery like the cutting off of a tongue and hands of a lady along with Hamlet's eerie soliloquy over a skull. You begin to wonder if Shakespeare was going through a majorly dark phase in his life when he wrote "King Lear" about the character's descent into madness and just how that can be played up in tremendous fashion for a modern audience.

We're talking about paranormal stuff, Wes Craven-style stuff. Even his other comedies can be reworked into a horror suspense angle that would make the bard cry and laugh at the same time in his grave. It's the true mark of a master of the written word as Shakespeare is (despite the unfortunate misquotes in history!).

Without a Doubt, a Necessity in the Horror Genre, Which We Need Today


Horror's been struggling for some truly unique and original material, which is the case for many a genre. But let's face it: we love horror. And we don't want the same butter churned over and over again.

So we look to the masters, those who've written priceless works even within other genres and aim to twist the stories with that sense of horror making our skin tingle. Bravo to Lifetime for doing that, and let's see some more of that inspiration for other works Shakespeare has done, taking the idea of the story, the structure, amping up the tragedy element, and frightening us to death.

That's an homage to the poet in all his glory, I'd say.... (In fact, I'll be writing a novel with an aim to highlight Shakespeare as well.... Think of "Shakespeare in Love" meets Stephen King, and you get the picture).

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Why THE FACULTY Has so Much in Common With Body Snatchers and Pink Floyd

The Faculty took the idea of the invasion and simply localized it. Instead of a planet -- everyone is in danger, no discrimination, nothing to signify what these aliens want or are looking for -- the alien(s) instead focused their effect on just those few teachers. Now there's an interesting high concept.

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The Top 10 Streaming Scary Movies of Today (According to Netflix)

Given that Netflix really is the master of their own data, how many times a viewer streams The Ridiculous 6, or what films don't get watched all the way straight through, or how many times someone watches an episode of Bill Nye Saves the World, it was easy for them to come up with the list based on just one percentage: 70 percent.

'It Follows': Not Just a Cautionary Tale About Casual Sex

And in all its basic-ness, you'd be shocked to realize that it's not just a linear-type film with one main idea. There are actually a ton of deep meanings behind all of the frames, the shots, the sequences, the scenes. With obviously the underlying principle, the whole point of it: meaningless sex is bad!

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